Jul. 22, 2014

amnhnyc:

Happy birthday to Vera Rubin! The pioneering astronomer turns 86 today. 

Learn about her career and contribution to the discovery of dark matter in this profile, and in our Dark Matter explainer video

(via gender-and-science)

Jul. 22, 2014
Jul. 22, 2014
themaninthegreenshirt:

“It is easy to love people in memory; the hard thing is to love them when they are there in front of you.”
— John Updike, My Father’s Tears and Other Stories

themaninthegreenshirt:

“It is easy to love people in memory; the hard thing is to love them when they are there in front of you.”

— John Updike, My Father’s Tears and Other Stories

(via heartbreakmonday)

Jul. 22, 2014
Jul. 22, 2014

micdotcom:

23 women show us their favorite positions

When reality television star and fashion blogger Lauren Conrad was asked what her “favorite position” was on a live radio program a while back, the women listening held their breath. Although we take great pride in the work that we do, most of us could relate to being undermined and belittled publicly at work. When Conrad cleverly retorted “CEO,” it was hard not to aggressively high-five our laptop and mobile devices. The words “hell” and “yeah” could be heard all across the nation.

1 in 3 women has experienced some form of sex discrimination at work | Follow micdotcom 

(via youngblackandvegan)

Jul. 22, 2014

pattilahell:

coolstoryfuckface:

Corn-Row Paintings by So Yoon Lym

Juxtapoz //

PAINTINGS?!

(via thesoftghetto)

Jul. 22, 2014
fertile-mind-seeks-water:


Anton Kannemeyer
Alphabet of Democracy series:B is for Black

Black is extraordinary. Magnificent. Divine. Royal. Dont let a being utter anything less in terms of blackness.

fertile-mind-seeks-water:

Anton Kannemeyer

Alphabet of Democracy series:
B is for Black

Black is extraordinary. Magnificent. Divine. Royal. Dont let a being utter anything less in terms of blackness.

(Source: myphilosophy101, via sheilastansbury)

Jul. 22, 2014
siddharthasmama:

lilbijou:

😊

my hero
Jul. 22, 2014

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Wayne Lawrence

Orchard Beach: The Bronx Riviera

Although New York’s Bronx is considered one of the most diverse communities in America out of which many subcultures originated, such as Hip Hop and Salsa, it’s still viewed as a no man’s land by many of the city’s inhabitants. Perhaps it is a matter of simple geography that many refuse to venture to the northernmost of the city’s five boroughs or, quite possibly, it may be the Borough’s malevolent reputation lingering from its tumultuous past.

From its earliest years, the Bronx has been a hotbed of immigrant working class families, but its image has largely been defined by the urban blight of the late 1960’s through to the 1980’s when arson, drug addiction and social neglect decimated many of its neighborhoods. For the families who have called this scarred landscape home, Orchard Beach, the only beach in the borough, was and remains a treasured respite from the sweltering confines of the concrete jungle. Built in the 1930s by urban planner Robert Moses, the beach carries the stigma as being one of the worst in New York and is commonly known as Horseshit Beach or Chocha Beach.

I began shooting portraits of Orchard Beach’s summertime regulars in 2005 shortly after moving to New York, realizing that the stigma attached to this oasis was largely unjustified - I felt compelled to engage with this community of working class families and colorful characters. The photographs in ‘Orchard Beach – The Bronx Riviera’ celebrate the pride and dignity of the beach’s visitors, working-class people.

Immediately catching the viewer’s eye is the extravagant style of many of the photographs’ subjects – a quest for identity and sense of belonging. Some individuals carry scars and markings that hint to their own personal histories, which often reflect the complex history of the borough itself. Within the gaze of those portrayed we see a community standing in defiance of popular opinion.

The six years I spent photographing Orchard Beach have not only given me the time and space to reflect on the importance of family and community, but also a sense of belonging and purpose. After having experienced the most profound grief when my older brother was brutally murdered, photography has not only offered me an opportunity to give a voice to a community often misunderstood but also a means of healing from the loss experienced.

— Wayne Lawrence / INSTITUTE

Via

(via thesoftghetto)

Jul. 22, 2014
Mirrors should think longer before they reflect.
— Jean Cocteau (via icanrelateto)

(via icanrelateto)

Jul. 22, 2014

Black Feminists: 2, Straight Black Dude Patriarchy:1.

They gone learn today from me. #changejobs.

Jul. 22, 2014
Note to self: every time you were convinced you couldn’t go on, you did.
— (107/365) by (DS)

(via sociolab)

Jul. 22, 2014

Not going to lie. That apology felt good. I really took being lied to personally. I know that I shouldn’t I just feel like, dude, if I give you your space, respect me by being honest. Even if it something I don’t want to hear.

Jul. 22, 2014
Changing Old Habits is So Hard.
— @Reninawrites #changejobs. #changeGods. Grace for Black girls.
Jul. 22, 2014
A stiff apology is a second insult…. The injured party does not want to be compensated because he has been wronged; he wants to be healed because he has been hurt.
— G.K. Chesterton (via icanrelateto)

(via icanrelateto)

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New Model Minority is the Tumblr little sister for the blog, www.newmodelminority.com- a blog on race, class, sexuality, feminism and my various other ideas.
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